Multi-factor authentication serves a vital function within any organization -securing access to corporate networks, protecting the identities of users, and ensuring that a user is who he claims to be.

Evolving business needs around cloud applications and mobile devices, combined with rising threats, and the need to reduce costs, require entirely new considerations for access control.

The Need for Multi-Factor Authentication

New threats, risks, and vulnerabilities as well as evolving business requirements underscore to the need for a strong authentication approach based on simple service delivery, choice, and future-forward scalability.

Today, organizations are asking:

  • Can I address new demands of my business — like cloud and mobile devices?
  • How do I map access control methods to business risk and the needs of my users?
  • Can I centrally manage, control and administer all my users and endpoints?
  • Who controls my user data?
  • How can I incorporate additional security layers to help me further fortify against threats?
  • And how do I keep it all practical and cost-effective?

More than ever, customers are looking for identity and access management solutions that deliver simplicity, automation, reduced TCO and choice.

What is Multi-factor authentication?

Multi-factor authentication ensures that a user is who they claim to be. The more factors used to determine a person’s identity, the greater the trust of authenticity. MFA can be achieved using a combination of the following factors:

  • Something You Know – password or PIN
  • Something You Have – token or smart card (two-factor authentication)
  • Something You Are – biometrics, such as a fingerprint (three-factor authentication)

Because multi-factor authentication security requires multiple means of identification at login, it is widely recognized as the most secure method for authenticating access to data and applications.